Australia Records Largest Carbon Trade Yet

Feb 9 2009 | 9:41am ET

Carbon broker Newedge Australia on Friday announced the country’s largest carbon trade to date – 50,000 tonnes sold forward at A$21.00 ($13.64) per tonne.

The broker did not name the parties involved in the trade.

The transaction in Australian Emission Units (AEU) was for settlement on November 1, 2011, making it the first transaction for 2011 settlement under Australia’s proposed cap-and-trade carbon emissions trading scheme, to be introduced mid-2010. An AEU is the basic unit that can be traded under the scheme.

The Australian government announced in December it would allow companies to import unlimited Certified Emissions Reductions (CERs) to offset greenhouse gas emissions. CERs are issued by the executive board of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) for emissions reductions achieved via CDM projects under the rules of the Kyoto Protocol.

CER prices have lost about 60% in the past six months, as production cuts by polluters have reduced demand for carbon credits to offset emissions.


In Depth

'Smart Beta' Funds In Regulators' Sights, Hedgies May Be Next

Mar 26 2015 | 11:11am ET

Funds that mimic strategies used by active managers for a fraction of the cost could...

Lifestyle

Study: Both Marriage and Divorce Lead to Negative Hedge Fund Performance

Mar 25 2015 | 6:51pm ET

Trouble at home leads to trouble in the market for fund managers, according to researchers...

Guest Contributor

Concerned About Your HFT Exposure? Hedge It!

Mar 26 2015 | 1:06pm ET

High-frequency trading has been a persistent storyline for several years. The trading...

 

Sponsored Content

    Mar 9 2015 | 6:35am ET

    Kelly RodriquesKelly RodriquesAs more investors look to diversify, many are beginning to use retirement funds to invest in alternative assets such as private equity and real estate. Kelly Rodriques, CEO & President of PENSCO Trust Company, explains how companies can connect with those looking to use their retirement accounts in a different way. Read more…

Editor's Note