Despite Rumors, No Trouble Between Chelsea Clinton, Ex-Hedgie Hubby

Feb 4 2011 | 2:09am ET

When former First Daughter Chelsea Clinton's husband Marc Mezvinsky abruptly quit his job at hedge fund 3G Capital Management to spend some months skiing without her, two things became inevitable: rumors of marital strife and denials of said strife.

Both have come to pass. Much Web (and some media) speculation has suggested that the two, married just six months ago, are on the rocks, despite reports that the daughter of former President Bill Clinton and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is visiting Mezvinsky in Jackson Hole, Wyo., every few weeks. No less august a source than the National Enquirer wrote that Mezvinsky left Clinton after a fight over starting a family, leaving her "devastated" and desiring an annulment.

And just as quickly, some members of their circle of friends have moved to defend them.

"The happy couple are happy," one friend told People magazine. "Any report suggesting there is trouble in the marriage is absolutely false."

An equally reputable source, New York Daily News gossip columnist Carson Griffith, seconded that opinion.

"I think a lot of people are hoping there's trouble between Chelsea and Marc, but it's just not the case," he said.

The trouble might be between Mezvinsky and the hedge fund industry, however. "What we can tell you is that, instead of a relationship crisis, it might be a work crisis for Marc," Griffith told WCBS News in New York.


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