Bridgewater's Comey Considered For Top FBI Job

Mar 17 2011 | 11:59am ET

A top hedge fund executive is a front-runner to become the next head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

James Comey, the general counsel for Bridgewater Associates, is among a handful of people being considered by the Obama administration to succeed outgoing Director Robert Mueller, who has held the post for nearly a decade. Before taking his current lucrative gig, Comey was a deputy attorney general and U.S. Attorney in Manhattan during the George W. Bush administration.

That didn't stop Comey from having a run-in with the White House during his tenure at the Justice Department: Comey, along with Mueller, threatened to resign in 2004 after Bush administration officials went over his head after he refused to certify the National Security Agency's domestic wiretapping program.

According to The Wall Street Journal, some in the White House are doubtful that Comey could be convinced to leave Bridgewater—and his big paycheck—to lead the FBI.

Other being considered for the post are, according to the Journal, veteran U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald, federal judge and Supreme Court finalist Merrick Garland, former top FBI agent Michael Mason, former Mueller deputy and Transportation Security Administration chief John Pistole, former FBI general counsel Kenneth Wainstein and former Clinton administration deputy attorney general and Sept. 11 commission member Jamie Gorelick.


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