USM Foundation Seeks CIO Who Understands Hedge Funds

Sep 27 2011 | 9:11am ET

 The University System of Maryland Foundation is seeking a new chief investment officer and has hired executive search firm Charles A. Skorina & Company to assist.

“We're looking for a seasoned investment pro with the demonstrated ability to run a large, multi-asset-class fund,” Charles Skorina wrote in his weekly email. “The Foundation's next CIO will have to understand the theory and practice of portfolio allocations, risk management, and the whole spectrum of assets, including alternatives and hedge funds.”

The USM Foundation has been without a CIO since June, when Michael Barry left to take up a position with the Georgetown University endowment. Barry had been with the USM Foundation for nine years and is credited with setting up its investment process and procedures.

The USM Foundation invests funds on behalf of the five University of Maryland campuses, six public universities and several community colleges. The foundation has approximately $900 million in assets under management.
 
In addition to being good with investments, the foundation’s next CIO “need[s] the management chops to run a staff, interface with a board and make hiring-firing decisions regarding external managers,”  wrote Skorina.

The position is located in the DC area.


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