Hedge Funder-Turned-Video Teacher Gets '60 Minutes' Profile

Mar 13 2012 | 11:06am ET

The plaudits keep pouring in for former hedge fund analyst Salman Khan and his online tutoring empire.

Khan left the hedge fund world three years ago to take what had been a helping hand for his cousin—YouTube videos tutoring her on math—and turn it into a major philanthropic venture. The Khan Academy has since grown to more than 3,000 videos available on its Web site, and with the videos now being used by 23 schools, Khan this week was profiled on CBS' landmark newsmagazine, "60 Minutes."

"I started getting feedback like, 'You know, my child has dyslexia, and this is the only thing that's getting into him,'" Khan told Sanjay Gupta. "I got letters from people saying, 'You know, we're praying for you and your family.' That's pretty heady stuff. People don't say that type of stuff to a hedge fund analyst normally."

Khan left hedge funds, having worked for Wohl Capital Management and Connective Capital, in 2009.

Over the past two years, the Khan Academy has received more than $15 million in funding from the Gates Foundation and Google.

"I got a call from Larry Cohen, who is Bill Gates' chief of staff," Khan said. "And he says, you know, 'You might have heard Bill's a fan.'" The call led to a meeting. "I was like, 'Yeah, you know, I think I could, you know, fly in, you know, between like laundry and a bath and meet with Bill."


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