'Hedge Fund' Madam To Tell All

Dec 10 2012 | 5:37am ET

These are not comfortable times for the hedge fund managers who used a suburban New York woman's prostitution ring.

That woman, Anna Gristina, plans to name names during an upcoming television appearance and in a new tell-all book. Gristina, who pleaded guilty to promoting prostitution in September, will head to California this week to tape a segment with television psychologist Dr. Phil—having first appeared in Manhattan state court to get approval to fly to California. She got it, despite the objections of prosecutors.

"There's going to be a giant name dropped—actually, a couple of them," Gristina told the New York Post. "Everyone's going to have to watch Dr. Phil. I will tell you that one of the names is high-level management" in the National Football League, she said. In addition, she promised to name an "older player who's still very well known."

"Tune in to Dr. Phil!"

Gristina's business, which she ran from her Monroe, N.Y., home to stay close to her four children, catered only to those with at least $1 million in the bank, including "hedge funders" and at least "two billionaires," according to the Post. A Scottish native, she could still be deported.

Gristina also plans to write a book about her life as a Manhattan madam.

Gristina was sentenced to time served—she spent four months on Rikers Island—when she pleaded guilty.


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