Rubenstein Urges Students To Study Humanities

Jan 24 2014 | 12:00pm ET

Everyone at the World Economic Forum seems to want to talk about the lack of technical and career-focused education. Everyone, that is, except for one political science major.

Carlyle Group co-founder David Rubenstein told Davos that American policy-makers and educators have put too much focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Without a well-rounded education, including the humanities, students may not develop critical-thinking skills.

"You shouldn't enter college worried about what you will do when you exit," Rubenstein, who studied politics at Duke University before moving on to law school at the University of Chicago, said.

The obsession with being job-ready is actually a false dichotomy: While students may feel the need to earn as much as possible as quickly as possible, due to the high cost of college, Rubenstein said a humanities education will lead to better pay over time. He noted that many top Wall Street executives have a humanities background like his own.

"H=MC," Rubenstein said. "Humanities equals more cash."


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