CFTC’s Chilton To Resign Friday

Mar 18 2014 | 10:24am ET

After sticking around for an extra few months to see the Volcker rule through, Bart Chilton will leave the Commodity Futures Trading Commission at the end of the week.

Chilton, who has served as a CFTC commissioner for seven years, had planned to leave last year. But he agreed, at the urging of lawmakers, to remain on until the final approval of the Volcker rule—which strictly limits banks’ alternative investment activities and bars them from proprietary trading—in December, as well as until a successor was identified.

That has also now come, with President Barack Obama’s nomination of Latham & Watkins lawyer Sharon Bowen to fill his seat. But Bowen, CFTC Chairman-designate Timothy Massad and Republican nominee J. Christopher Giancarlo are all awaiting confirmation by the Senate, which means that Chilton’s exit will leave the CFTC with just two commissioners, led by acting Chairman Mark Wetjen.

Chilton said he plans to write a book about how power-brokers affected regulatory policy before, during and after the economic crises. Chilton has been one of the toughest voices on the commission for strict regulation.


In Depth

'Smart Beta' Funds In Regulators' Sights, Hedgies May Be Next

Mar 26 2015 | 11:11am ET

Funds that mimic strategies used by active managers for a fraction of the cost could...

Lifestyle

Study: Both Marriage and Divorce Lead to Negative Hedge Fund Performance

Mar 25 2015 | 6:51pm ET

Trouble at home leads to trouble in the market for fund managers, according to researchers...

Guest Contributor

Concerned About Your HFT Exposure? Hedge It!

Mar 26 2015 | 1:06pm ET

High-frequency trading has been a persistent storyline for several years. The trading...

 

Sponsored Content

    Mar 9 2015 | 6:35am ET

    Kelly RodriquesKelly RodriquesAs more investors look to diversify, many are beginning to use retirement funds to invest in alternative assets such as private equity and real estate. Kelly Rodriques, CEO & President of PENSCO Trust Company, explains how companies can connect with those looking to use their retirement accounts in a different way. Read more…

Editor's Note