Hedge Fund Replication A Threat, Says TABB

Jan 24 2008 | 8:43am ET

In recent years, institutional investors have had a nearly insatiable appetite for alternative investments, a trend widely expected to continue for years, possibly even decades, to come. But a new report from the TABB Group throws cold water on that thesis, warning hedge funds and other active asset managers of the threat posed by index-based investing.

Report author Adam Sussman, research director at TABB, calls the appetite for index-based investments “nearly insatiable,” noting that active managers are already losing out on some $12 billion in management fees due to the $1 trillion U.S. investors have put into index-based products. That pain has so far been felt mostly by traditional asset managers, such as mutual funds, but Sussman cautions that hedge funds, which manage some $2 trillion globally, are not immune.

“There’s no slowing down the tide of indexing,” he said. “Pension plans need better ways to measure the performance of alternative asset managers. ETF, exchange-traded note and other index-based managers will need more products in the pipeline.”

Specifically, hedge fund replication strategies could put a serious crimp in hedge fund managers’ styles, costing them further billions in fees. Sussman says that by next year, some 70% of all pension plans will be utilizing customized benchmarks. And there are plenty available: He estimates that there are 48,256 possible indices versus 40,365 publicly-traded companies.


In Depth

Steinbrugge: Top 10 Hedge Fund Industry Trends for 2017

Jan 3 2017 | 9:03pm ET

Each year, Agecroft Partners' Don Steinbrugge predicts the top hedge fund industry...

Lifestyle

'Tis the Season: Wall Street Holiday Parties Back In Fashion

Dec 22 2016 | 9:23pm ET

Spending on Wall Street holiday parties has largely returned to pre-2008 levels...

Guest Contributor

DarcMatter: The Top Trends in Alternative Investments for 2017

Jan 13 2017 | 8:22pm ET

The $7 trillion alternative investments industry is poised for continued growth...

 

From the current issue of

Securities and Exchange Commission Chair Mary Jo White will step down as chair of the nation’s Wall Street overseer in January, setting the stage for a potential conservative shift in the regulator’s leadership under the incoming Donald Trump administration.